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Blade Shapes

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If you need an effective chopping or hacking adventure blade, you know the Kukri blade shape is a sure winner. Also known as the Gurkha Kukri, this impressive blade combines the power of a hatchet and a knife’s finesse. However, this hefty knife has more than what meets the eye. In our piece today, we get down to the basics of the Gurkha Kukri, its background, uses, and how it fairs against another blade. Here’s…

For knife enthusiasts, each knife suits a particular need, and it helps to learn what kind of knife you are looking to work on within time. There are, of course, many knife blade examples, each made with a specific purpose, such as for kitchen utility, hunting, fishing, or basic survival. One of these common blade examples is the drop point blade style. There is a good chance you have come across such a blade and…

Before stepping out to buy that next pocket knife or fixed blade knife, you need to be aware there are different types of blades including clip point, drop point, tanto, trailing point, and so on. Some blades are made for hunting, skinning, or fishing purposes. Other blade designs fit kitchen utility with many household roles. In particular, our focus is on the clip point blade style that has been a popular choice for every possible…

Before we look into a reverse tanto, it would help us understand what a regular tanto blade is. Tanto blades are short Japanese blades that curve up to the tip. Tanto blades can be double-edged, where the end rises to the spine at a sharp angle, and this type is referred to as the American tanto. They are effective for piercing and slashing. Reverse tanto blades are the modern versions of the original tanto blade.…

Tanto blades are characterized by a sharp-angled tip, with a small curve or belly towards the main edge. The tip of the Tanto blades somehow takes the shape of a chisel point but is more pointy and doubled angle. The original Tanto blade design has its origin in Japan and was meant for close-quarter combat. Depending on the manufacturer, they were produced following different heat treatment styles, designs, and details. However, the blades were mostly…

Differentiating a Wharncliffe blade from a Sheepsfoot blade and vice versa is usually confusing to many people, which is understandable if you consider that they share a raft of similarities. The main difference between a Wharncliffe blade and a Sheepsfoot blade is that a Wharncliffe blade incorporates the use of a slanting spine while a Sheepsfoot blade employs a spine that is parallel to the cutting edge. For that reason, a Wharncliffe comes with a…

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